Archive for June, 2010

30
Jun
10

Ohmicide:Melohman distortion reviewed by the Waveformless blog

Tom Shear from the Waveformless blog made review of our Ohmicide:Melohman distortion. We’ll spoil his conclusion: “Regardless of your experience level, Ohmicide sounds undeniably great. It can sound analog, it can sound totally digital, or you can mash the two together into your own monstrosity. This is the kind of plug-in you will find yourself getting lost in for hours with a big grin on your face the whole time. You neighbors might not be as amused.” But his analysis is much more in-depth than that, click here to read his full blog post.

29
Jun
10

Demo track for the Symptohm:Melohman Performer Edition free synth

Dutch artist Remco has made a nice demo track for the Symptohm:Melohman Performer Edition free synth. Except for the drum sounds (for which he used Drumatic) all sounds are from the Symptohm, take a listen! And then if you want to check out his tracks, there are many in his Soundcloud profile

23
Jun
10

How to recycle dead instrument’s parts in a cool “Bassoforte”

In the last 2 years we read an ever growing amount of blog posts about people making sounds from the most odd objects or using pens, towels, Nike sneakers or even the dog shit sticked on it as MIDI controllers – and all of that to mostly make completely uninteresting music. Then we watched this video of Diego Stocco playing his hybrid instrument “Bassoforte”, made of parts from an old piano, a bass, a guitar and such. There’s hope! Not only it’s a pleasure see a passionate guy constructing a new instrument but he actually composed good music with it. Then we take a look at his site and realize: making music with his house’s tree and bushes and making music from sand have been his past projects. Already in the good music field, maybe just because in addition of being an music/audio hacker he has some talent.

17
Jun
10

Engin Hassan, former Rocket Networks member, talks about music collaboration

It’s been a while since computer based musicians rave on real-time music collaboration. And during last decade’s first half, there was a strong team working hard on an tool that – despite finding some obstacles – was such a good enterprise for that time and helped to push real-time collaboration’s boundaries. We’re talking about the Rocket Network, an add-on tool that used to work together with some DAWs providing collaboration features. Some of you teenagers out there starting to produce music today don’t remember that, but anyone more experienced knows what Rocket we’re talking about. Engin Hassan knows – and remembers it – very well, as he’s a former member of the Rocket Network team. We’ve interviewed him and he tells to the ohmworld how things were in the backstage, the goals and the pitfalls of their attempt, and why he’s enthousiast with the Ohm Studio.

Please tell us about the Rocket Networks enterprise and what was your job there?

Well I had a few jobs with Rocket Network. I started out as part of the beta team and then went on to join the demo team. As a member of the demo team it was my job to send audio back and forth to Rocket representatives who were showing the system to potential clients. So for example a rocket representative would be in a production facility in lets say New York and would say to me “ok I have just started a new session and I’d like you to send me a drum break”. I would prepare a drum track and post it to the session. Within a short space of time it would magically appear on the screen at the other end for the client to see. Later on when rocket went live I also joined the Online Facilitators team who’s job it was to greet new people (virtually in the welcome lobby that is) who were trying out the software and offer to show them round. For those who are wondering, Rocket was incorporated into three of the major sequencers at that time: Logic, Cubase, and Pro tools. The idea was that you could collaborate with other people who were using the same software i.e. other Cubase users or other Pro Tools users on projects. Communication would be via a chat app built into the Rocket interface and you would be able to move around the virtual studios and join projects the same way you would move around chat rooms for instance. Once you had entered a virtual studio you could start downloading the project in that studio into your audio software straight away. You could also chat with other users who were present in that studio at that time. If you liked what you heard you could add something yourself and post it to the session for the other users to hear. For example the other guy present in the session who was in Madrid posted a very cool percussion part to track one. If you wanted to add a bass line then you would go ahead and record the bass part as normal on another spare track and then press post. Within a short space of time it would appear in the other guys session for him to hear. Because Rocket used virtual studios that resided on the Rocket servers you did not necessarily need to be there at the same time as the other person. If you were busy your other collaborators could start a session and post it up to the virtual studio and you could download it and add your own parts later when you got home. Continue reading ‘Engin Hassan, former Rocket Networks member, talks about music collaboration’

15
Jun
10

See the Ohm Studio in action! Two guys making music together in realt-time in a live demo video…

Let’s see some of Ohm Studio’s real-time collaborative features in action. This video was made at the Ohm Force headquarters (Paris, France) while the Ohm Server is in USA (we use the AWS solution, by Amazon). Two laptops are running the Ohm Studio prototype and both are logged into the same Ohm Studio session. Notice that all actions done on one side are automatically synced to the other side! Come watch it on HD and read more info about this video here.

14
Jun
10

Risko Disko uses Hematohm on remix and gives away the preset

Mario Vin Hager aka Risko Disko was one of the participants of our Remix Cohmpetition earlier this year (click here to listen to his remix) and ended it with an Hematohm frequency shifter in his hands. Now he shares with the ohmworld one remix he did for a track from Disco Ensemble called “Protector” – in which his Hematohm had an important role. “I used a preset slightly changed on the Envelope’s Tempo and Release and an adjustment on the LFO Period…voilá!!!  It’s in the build up between 1:00 and 1:28 that effect on one of the voices desceding like an aeroplane with an help from reverb touches.”, explains Mario himself. Not only he shares the track, but also the Hematohm preset that he fine-tuned, which you can download here.

11
Jun
10

12 reasons to love the Symptohm:Melohman synth

The Music Radar site is asking their audience “What are the best VST-synths you can buy?“. Swiss DJ and music producer  – and Symptohm:Melohman enthousiast – Dominic Reamonn answered their poll and copied us on his mail to Music Radar. You can guess his vote, but not necessarily his very own emotional reasons to love this powersynth 🙂

“My vote goes to Ohm Force’s Symptohm. Why? Because of all the synths out there that I have tried, Symptohm is the only one that:

  • Has an Ape’s ass as part of its interface
  • Has envelopes and LFOs per parameter (excluding Minimonsta, of course)
  • Contains 4 banks of filters with a total of 30+ filters
  • Has an Ape’s ass as part of its interface
  • Has delay times that can be LFOed for total glitch fests
  • Scares cats
  • Is fairly unknown, which makes me look different, and thus better
  • Was made by a sandwich company.
  • Can produce totally unique and expressive sounds with next to no effort at all.
  • Has an established YouTube fanbase centered around the works of Jack McOck and Professor Von Schwarzenberg.
  • Doesn’t crash any more.
  • Has an Ape’s ass as part of its interface.

And of course, because it has an Ape’s ass as part of its interface, I can spend less time purring over animal porn and more on making music. Ça va de soi!”