Archive for the 'ohm studio' Category

21
Jan
11

Gradee & Trukers: breakbeat duo across the US and Spain

Seann Graddy aka Gradee is from Florida, USA – while Rubén Gómez aka Trukers is from Seville, Spain. Don’t think that the whole Atlantic ocean between these breakbeat aficionados was capable of avoiding them to make some highly danceable tunes as duo. No one said it was easy, as they use different DAWs and mostly have to send big files back and forth, but despite the difficulties the first release is imminent on Rune Recordings. Individually they have already released some cool tracks on several different labels. During this interview they tell us a bit more about their current collaborative work flow, and what are their main expectations about the Ohm Studio

How did you meet each other and how the collaborative project started?
We met through Soundcloud. We both have a slant towards breakbeats mostly of the progressive style. So far we have just been remixing each others work for independent record labels. Recently we decided to work on a track together, which made us start looking for a DAW with collaborative features – if there would be any. Ohm Studio looks like the perfect fit, for instance we had to found some other ways to do it.

What is your current collaboration method?
Currently we’re just passing stems back and forth and working in our respective DAWs. Obviously it’s hard to get a shared arrangement in this way. In terms of who does what we’re just experimenting. Trukers is better at the overall arrangement so he’ll focus on that. I’ve got a bit more experience with mastering. We both like breakbeats so we collaborate on the rhythm programming.

How do you manage the mix part of the process?
Right now it’s done mostly by one person once the arrangement is finished. With Ohm Studio I could definitely see this being much more collaborative depending on how it handles the plug-ins that the other may not have.

How the fact of using two different music workstations (Live and FL) affect your collaborative work flow?
We’re both very strong and very comfortable in our respective DAWs so of course we both wish the other worked in the same DAW. It makes what you can pass back and forth somewhat limiting and like I said it makes it very difficult to collaborate on the arrangment.

Between Live and FL Studio, which one is currently more suitable for collaborative purposes?
LOL, I think we’d both argue in favor of our respective DAWs but honestly unless both of you are working in the same DAW neither of them is super collaborative friendly and frankly neither is really set up to collaborate yet. It definitely requires you to keep the setup somewhat simple.

Beside the DAWs, do you share the same plug-in setup and/or same additional hardware?
We both have different VSTs so we usually just flatten tracks down to a stem and pass it back and forth fully processed. I’m very curious to see what kind of mechanism Ohm Studio has for users that don’t share the exact same VST library.

What are your main difficulties/frustrations about your current setup and collaboration method?
Basically we want to work together in real time. I want it to be like I’m almost in the studio with him if though we’re in two different countries halfway around the globe. I’d like to be able to do both voice chat and text chat while working on a track. I’d like him to be able to hear my VST process on an audio part even if he doesn’t have it. If he likes it then I could flatten the track and save it.

Regarding the analysis you could make of nowadays music collaboration scene, there would be more demand for a workstation providing seamless project sharing features (for an asynchronous work) or for seamless real-time features, allowing people to work together at the same time?
I think its all about having the option to do both. There are going to be times where you want to work in real time together, but there may be times where one person is working on the track independently. Giving the users the ability to both is truly where the power is at. Since real time collaboration has never been done that well yet , I can tell you we’re very excited about the potential of Ohm Studio.

So what are your main expectations regarding the Ohm Studio?
It just works. It somehow shrinks the globe and puts Trukers and I into the virtual studio together at the same time for the first time ever. It’s got to be stable. Bugs and performance issues can kill a potentially great piece of software where you first impression is bad and you never come back. I find Live incredibly intuitive to use. I’m hopeful that OhmStudio is similar. Don’t over complicate it!

Do you see the Ohm Studio more as a good way to make music with the people you already know, or as a good way to find new people to collaborate with?
Again I think it’s both. I find it extremely exciting to think that the virtual studio is now opened up to literally anyone in the world that has the same musical mission as yourself.

Where could we listen/purchase music made by you?
Both Trukers and I can be found on Soundcloud, respectively here and here. There you’ll find tracks we’ve done with each that are appearing on labels such as Rune Recordings, VIM Records and Breaks.sk.

What are your plans for 2011?
Trukers and I both getting a bit more recognition in the breaks community and we hope that something like OhmStudio will help us take our game to the next level. Bigger and Better!

08
Sep
10

Ohm Studio beta-testers come from already 95 different countries, come take a look at the full country list…

There are already several thousands of subscribed beta-testers for the Ohm Studio – and we’re glad to see that in the Cohmunity there will be people from (at least!) 95 different countries! So it means collaborative minded people from ninety five different places, different musical cultures and background, united for the music. It’s quite exciting and there will maybe be even more: if you’re reading this post and are not seeing your home country in the list below, don’t think twice, pick your flag and subscribe to the beta test now 🙂
  1. AFGHANISTAN
  2. ALBANIA
  3. ALGERIA
  4. ANGOLA
  5. ARGENTINA
  6. AUSTRALIA
  7. AUSTRIA
  8. BAHAMAS
  9. BAHRAIN
  10. BARBADOS
  11. BELARUS
  12. BELGIUM
  13. BOLIVIA
  14. BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
  15. BRAZIL
  16. BULGARIA
  17. CANADA
  18. CHILE
  19. CHINA
  20. COLOMBIA
  21. COSTA RICA
  22. CROATIA
  23. CYPRUS
  24. CZECH REPUBLIC
  25. DENMARK
  26. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
  27. ECUADOR
  28. EGYPT
  29. EL SALVADOR
  30. ESTONIA
  31. FINLAND
  32. FRANCE
  33. GEORGIA
  34. GERMANY
  35. GREECE
  36. GUATEMALA
  37. HONG KONG
  38. HUNGARY
  39. ICELAND
  40. INDIA
  41. INDONESIA
  42. IRELAND
  43. ISRAEL
  44. ITALY
  45. JAMAICA
  46. JAPAN
  47. KAZAKHSTAN
  48. LATVIA
  49. LEBANON
  50. LITHUANIA
  51. LUXEMBOURG
  52. MACEDONIA
  53. MALAYSIA
  54. MALTA
  55. MARTINIQUE
  56. MAURITIUS
  57. MEXICO
  58. MOLDOVA
  59. MOROCCO
  60. NETHERLANDS
  61. NEW ZEALAND
  62. NORWAY
  63. PERU
  64. PHILIPPINES
  65. POLAND
  66. PORTUGAL
  67. PUERTO RICO
  68. QATAR
  69. RÉUNION
  70. ROMANIA
  71. RUSSIAN FEDERATION
  72. SAUDI ARABIA
  73. SERBIA
  74. SINGAPORE
  75. SLOVAKIA
  76. SLOVENIA
  77. SOLOMON ISLANDS
  78. SOUTH AFRICA
  79. SOUTH KOREA
  80. SPAIN
  81. SWEDEN
  82. SWITZERLAND
  83. SYRIA
  84. TAIWAN
  85. THAILAND
  86. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
  87. TUNISIA
  88. TURKEY
  89. UKRAINE
  90. UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  91. UNITED KINGDOM
  92. UNITED STATES
  93. URUGUAY
  94. UZBEKISTAN
  95. VENEZUELA
03
Sep
10

Lanvary duo makes collaborative progressive house music between Moldovia and Dubai. They told us how they work…

Lanvary is Alex Sanches and Andrew. They are both from Moldovia and already use to make music together there. But Alex had to move to Dubai because of his job, then online musical collaboration became a natural solution for them to keep their music duo. So it’s been more than a year that these two guys are working hard – and having a good time after all – remotely, and it seems that it’s being worhwhile: several tracks made, a place in our last Remix Cohmpetition’s Top 5 (as their former alias “Kinki & NKoder”) and already some labels interested in release their tunes. In this interview they give us more details on their collaborative working methods and comment how they intend to use the Ohm Studio for their future productions…

1- Are you guys more focused on remixing or producing your own tracks?

The collaboration has roughly about an year since we started the production on serious level. Everything started with the remix of a track of mine, but the collaboration slowly evolved in a melting pot of ideas for original tracks, and speaking numbers we have created more original tracks together than remixes.

2- What’s your setup (hardware and software)?

I do use MacBook Pro running Windows and Andrew (Nkoder) uses a PC, we both are on Continue reading ‘Lanvary duo makes collaborative progressive house music between Moldovia and Dubai. They told us how they work…’

12
Aug
10

South Wales’ producer Ceri Charlton shares his experiences of almost 10 years of online music collaborations, talks about his methods and tools…

Ceri Charlton is from Barry, an ex-docking town in South Wales, UK. He’s been doing online musical collaborations over the last 10 years and has some interesting experiences/feedback to share. In this interview he explains which tools and methods he used at the very beginning – with him and his partners running on Fruity Loops – and how things evolved to his current method: he and his partner already working on Reason 4 and planning to go for Reason 5 as soon as it’s released. He also talks a bit about the mixing process in a collaborative environment and which features he’d like to see on the Ohm Studio. You can listen to Ceri’s most recent collaborative productions here, they will make a nice soundtrack while you read the lines below…

Who are your musical partners and where are they from?

The main guy I work with at the moment is called Straker and he’s from Worcester, which is just over the border from me, in England. In the past, I’ve collaborated online with people from all over the world, Australia, Holland, Germany, Sweden, France, America, Chile.

So online collaboration has been a important role on your musical path?

Very important indeed. I think that’s one of the benefits of the internet from a social point of view is that you can “meet” people who you’d otherwise never bump into. From a musical point of view, this is particularly important. A lot of people talk nowadays globalisation and cultural homogenisation but, unless you live in a big city, if you have any sort of niche or indie musical tastes, you’ll really struggle to meet significant numbers of people with the same interest. Of these, only a small proportion will be making music that you’re into, so your prospective ‘partners’ are fairly limited. The internet takes away these restrictions that your physical location imposes.

At the beginning, how was using Fruity Loops for your collaborative productions?

I think the first thing I ever collaborated online with was Fruityloops 3.xx.xx, one of those really long version numbers that contained all the details of the patch level! In terms of collaboration, one of the best things was being able to save a file containing all samples used as well as the actual track itself and then ship that one zipped file off to whoever you wanted to share it with. Prior to that, it was limited to exchanging CD-rs, and even floppy disks with a very small group of school friends.

The other nice thing was that it came bundled with some samples, FX and synths, in one particular collaboration, we agreed to stick to just these, to keep files sizes down (so that it was mainly just a glorified midi file and patch data being sent).

Both these things were such big benefits and gave so much freedom to edit/tweak the other person’s material that at the time I only really sough out collaborations with people who would work in Fruity Loops too. I remember experimenting with ‘remixing’ style collaborations where the other person gave you a set of .wav files and (if it wasn’t obvious) Continue reading ‘South Wales’ producer Ceri Charlton shares his experiences of almost 10 years of online music collaborations, talks about his methods and tools…’

20
Jul
10

West coast electronic act “FTPP” explains how they collaborate today and their expectations for the Ohm Studio…

Robert LaDue and Matt Hettich attended together the California Institute Of The Arts some years ago and are good friends ever since. They already used to make music together at that time, as a band called “FTPP”. Then Matt moved to Oakland, while Robert stayed in Los Angeles: online musical collaboration became the obvious solution to keep their music plans up and going. Renoise is their sequencer of choice, and they told us in this quick interview how they manage their project files sharing and what they expect from the Ohm Studio… and their collaborative moves.

How long have you guys been making music together?

Since early 2007ish.   We met while attending Calarts.  We began the collaboration using the same process that we still use today; passing renoise files back and forth.

Why have you chosen Renoise to collaborate?

Renoise doesn’t use wav files, which is one of the reasons why we really enjoy it.  It sends compact ogg vorbis files (I think).  Each Renoise file can contain a large number of lengthy samples (i.e. multiple vocal takes, guitar parts, etc. ) and remain a relatively small size. The reason we chose this software Continue reading ‘West coast electronic act “FTPP” explains how they collaborate today and their expectations for the Ohm Studio…’

05
Jul
10

American electronic music duo talks about their current collaboration methods and Ohm Studio expectations…

Keith is from Los Angeles and Arthur from Burbank, both towns in California (USA) and virtually not that far from each other. But the LA megalopolis and its speedy life boost distances and these two friends found on online music collaboration their efficient method to evolve their musical duo. Things started in 2002, when they still used to attend high school.  At that time Keith and Arthur used to play together in a few rock bands; then the university put the duo apart and both have discovered computer based music, that became a passion ever since. Among their several projects, Cuello Nectar is currently their official one: electronic music with high doses of hispanic vibes.

1 – What is your current method for online music collaboration?

It’s been already a year that we’re using Ableton Live with Dropbox and its fantastic. Before we tried sending sessions over AIM or even sending Mp3 files by e-mail (which gave us some cool resampling ideas) but now with Dropbox we keep all of our sessions for our various projects in a 50Gb account ($10 a month) and we are always in sync and working on the same stuff. Wether I am at work, at home on my desktop, or on my laptop in a cafe. I can add to our music or make up a new track and in minutes its on his computer. I also use it to collaborate with other friends or share samples I’ve made by sharing a folder with them or giving them a public link.

Literally we can work on tracks in a day, and have them be 90% done. I work 2 hours, he works 2 hours, and and back to me or editing and mixing and its done. We just directly share the folder where we save the project, together with all project files and sub-folders, no zipping or unpacking. We’re both on Macs, but I have an old G5 and he’s on a more recent Intel one, so he don’t have some of my old plug-ins that are not UB. Regarding this plug-in issue, I usually deal with by freezing the track if its a synth. If its a processor (compressor, reverb) I usually don’t worry about it because it’s only me who do the final mix and Live has no problem working with sets with missing plug-ins, so it’s Ok for our specific case. So any saves he makes I can open up and my plug-ins are still there with my settings.

Sometimes, when track counts get high, we add tracks to a session with a rough mix to save CPU for and lower latency for recording. Continue reading ‘American electronic music duo talks about their current collaboration methods and Ohm Studio expectations…’

01
Jul
10

British techie magazine “Click” made a 5 page feature about the Ohm Studio, come take look

British techie magazine Click made a 5 page feature about the Ohm Studio in their recent June edition! For all the guys in UK it’s just about going to the news agent, but for the rest of the world to purchase this mag could be more complicated, so we scanned the article in a quality good enough for reading it. We scanned page by page, here they are: Page1, Page2, Page3Page4 and Page5